Tribute

flag_half_mastAs we get into 2015 I take a moment to ponder on the end of  2014. A trio had planned to have an end of year Skype contact. Sadly the most important member of the trio, Stan, died.

Stan was our TI (Trade Instructor) at the RAF Technical School in matters of Radio Telecommunications in our training days of 1963-4. An instructor of much experience in the field and already a senior non-commissioned officer when assigned to the school. Patiently teaching us pimply lads he was a real gentleman who went so far as to give up his leisure time for the boys.

Flight-Sargent Butlin at Open Day
Flight-Sargent Butlin at Open Day

We were fortunate to have a Skype trio contact including Stan on 29th December 2013. The contact was to celebrate 50 years on since being taught by Stan and to reminisce on our subsequent careers. On this occasion, I told Stan that the knowledge he had imparted to us had benefited me in both my military and civilian careers. I remember Stan being surprised that his training had benefited us for our later civilian jobs. Naturally, then, Stan only saw the RAF aspects of his training schedule. He could not foresee that for many of us it would give us the experience to ease employment after our military careers. I for one, was grateful for what I had received from Stan in that particular field. That Skype trio conversation between Stan, Terry and myself lasted for 1 hour and forty-five minutes as each of us took turns to speak and take a sip of a favourite beverage.

We had planned to do the same Skype hook-up in December 2014 but sadly it was not to be. Stan died on 7th December 2014. The funeral was held on 18th December 2014 at Yardley Crematorium, near Birmingham, UK and attended by Terry who represented us old boys. Stan cannot be forgotten because he was part of our formative and youthful years. Also remembered as one of the instructors that inspired us to meet high standards in our training. He was an experienced and respected radio ham enthusiast and some of us caught the bug from him. We remember our Stan who left an indelible and positive mark in our lives. Silent Key, RIP.

Further reading (click on links below):
Article, photos on Stan's career, report on the 2013 Skype contact
Tribute Page on RAF 48th Entry Telegs website
RAF Benevolent Fund Tribute Book page for Stan

11 thoughts on “Tribute”

  1. I met Stan when I visited RAF Changi in October 1969, I was in the Air Training Corps and was so lucky as an 18 year old to go on an overseas flight and have a few days in Singapore. At the time I had just got my call G3XEF and Stan gave me much encouragement – I remember being in awe of his Collins, beam antenna etc. and he gave generously of his time, telling me about the impending withdrawal form east of Suez. I remember leaving Stan some money for him to purchase and send me a Copal digital clock – which I still have!

    1. Thanks for your memories Mike. Stan was a generous guy and we appreciated his teaching and sharing of experience. He was G3MRP a very active operator he opened up the bug for many of us in the R.A.F.

  2. Thank you Mike Eggleton
    for the excellent and interesting tribute to Stan.
    I know he remembered you, when I asked him over a year ago.
    “We Will Remember Him”
    Terry

  3. I recall Stan with memories of a friendly face and someone who was only too willing to respond to any requests for help with either training or general ‘Boy Entrant life’. I ‘met’ him some years ago over the airwaves whilst I was active as a radio ham (G4IZZ). We met quite by accident, (using morse, of course), and only gradually realised we knew each other from Cosford. I was quite surprised he remembered me (just one out of hundreds) but he’d accompanied the 48th Entry on our camping expedition to Wales – where I had won a ‘cross country’ race around a lake. He’d handed me the 10 shillings prize!!

    I’m very glad to see we were represented at his funeral.
    Mike Eggleton.

      1. There is ALWAYS room for one more! It will be included in Monday’s post. None of these men should be left un-remembered!

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